Résumé Myths

I can do my own résumé – And it might be true. There certainly are people who can. But most of us can’t be that objective. It takes asking the right questions to get the most useful information highlighting your achievements. Then you must address the audience to whom you intend to direct your résumé. You have all the facts, but we will take that information and emphasize those accomplishments – putting you in the best possible light. Employers want to know why they should hire you for the job over someone else. If the interviewer wants to present your résumé to her/his boss, that résumé should be attractive and underscore your accomplishments. That’s what we can best do for you.

My résumé will get me a job – Sorry, but your résumé is intended to get you an interview. Once you have the interview scheduled, you will be in a position to study the company and prepare for your interview. Your accomplishments, experience, knowledge of the company, and the way to conduct yourself in an interview gets you the job.

The more information I include in my résumé and cover letter, the more likely I am to get hired. – Unfortunately, this is probably the biggest mistake people make when they prepare their own résumé. The interview is where you share the information about what you do on a daily basis, how you were able to achieve those highlighted points on your résumé.

My résumé has to be kept to one page. – We’ll agree with that if that’s all it takes to legibly, honestly, and effectively tell prospective employers why they should hire you. But hold on! Most of us can only do it in one page if we sacrifice type size, details, and job history. None of that is recommended. More importantly, it won’t make an impact on prospective employers. So one page is fine if it works, but it likely will take two pages for most of us. Keep in mind, if properly developed, a typical résumé does have your most current and important information on the first page, anyhow. And, that’s what is primary to supporting your eligibility for the position.

I have 20 years of experience. I need to get all of that on my résumé. – Well the truth is there is a need to explain what you have done throughout your working career. But most of the time you will get considered for hiring based on what you have done most recently.  That’s why we go into detail for your last 10, 12 maybe 15 years of employment. The rest of your employment history is summarized, or at least goes into much less detail. Of course there are always exceptions.

I must show all my job responsibilities on my résumé. – Actually a résumé should be accomplishment-oriented, not job description-oriented.  Sure, a brief description of your job responsibilities, but you will need to highlight your accomplishments.  And NOT in detail . . . leave something for the interview.  Employers do want to know scope of responsibility and metrics for achievements wherever possible.